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Subject: "Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning your b" Archived thread - Read only
 
 
Conferences > International New Scooter BBS > Topic #1376
Reading Topic #1376

twobitscooterwhore
unregistered user
Nov-07-04, 02:51 AM (EDT)
 
"Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning your b"
 
   What's the real scoop on tailoring your scoot performance with the roller weights? Are there any charts I can use to explain how the various weight values and combinations affect the performance of the bike? What are your experiences with testing weights?
And is weight the only variation between rollers?
Thanks, Victor


 

 
Brooke
Member since Jun-3-02
2807 posts
Nov-07-04, 03:09 AM (EDT)
 
1. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #0
 
   In general it's just weight. different variators can have different sizes but I don't know of how that affects performance.

The lighter the weight, the slower it will stay in a lower "gear" ratio. If the weight is too heavy it will move to a larger diameter front pulley too quickly. If it's too light it will stay in a smaller diamter for too long, for optimum performance. The pipe, carb, cylinder, rear pulley spring, and clutch stall speed settings can change the way a given weight will translate to best performance. Rider weight can make a big difference as well. Given those factors it is difficult to say. Some exhaust makers include a set of rollers to suit a scooter that is stock in all other respects. That is just a ball park but it's usually close. The best way is to find somone who has a close set up and use that as a starting point. After that it's trial and error or lots of previous experience.

what is your set up?


 
Spock
Member since Apr-3-03
2009 posts
Nov-08-04, 10:51 AM (EDT)
 
2. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #0
 
   Lighter weights will give you better take off speeds, but not great top end. Heavy weights will give you faster top end, but not great take off speeds. Also, the heavier the weight, the lower the rpms. So, if you do a lot of cruising, you might consider the heavier roller weights, but if you race your friends around, you might want the ligher weights.
Ask et4inmonterey. He actually has a combination of light AND heavy rollers in his variator. Always wanted to ask him about that.

Judging by the amount of pollution in the atmosphere, I would conclude that we have arrived at a scooter rally in the late 20th century.


 
twobitscooterwhore
unregistered user
Nov-08-04, 07:43 PM (EDT)
 
3. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #2
 
   Is it not true that since the diameter of the rollers do not change the minimum rpm (at the rear wheel) and the maximum rpm (at the rear wheel) do not change? What should change is only the power curve with a steeper acceleration curve at the bottom end with flatter acceleration curve at the top end with heavier weights. Because of the gyroscopic effect of "throwing" heavier rollers outwards . . . make sense?

Say, if you have a plate with a peanut and a walnut sitting on it and you spin the plate. The heavier mass of the walnut will fly outwards quicker than the peanut with a lighter mass.

I'd bet that the Malossi Multivar 2000 variator plate has a different ramp configuration for the rollers than the stock plate.

Victor


 
Spock
Member since Apr-3-03
2009 posts
Nov-08-04, 08:45 PM (EDT)
 
4. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #3
 
   I looked at my stock variator, and I think you're correct on that. The packaging for the weights is pretty specific though, as far as italian translations go, the heavier weights reduce your RPM's and the lighter ones increase them. Also, I thought the Malossi weights only fit the Malossi Variator?

Judging by the amount of pollution in the atmosphere, I would conclude that we have arrived at a scooter rally in the late 20th century.


 
et4inmonterey
unregistered user
Nov-08-04, 09:45 PM (EDT)
 
5. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #3
 
   >>Say, if you have a plate with a peanut and a walnut sitting on it and you spin the plate. The heavier mass of the walnut will fly outwards quicker than the peanut with a lighter mass.<<

but if the peanut doesn't make it all the way to the edge of the plate (it has a lot to work against) the rpm at the rear wheel will be less.

if someone came in on this thread halfway through they'd think Vespa's ran peanuts in the transmission!

and to correct something I wrote in the other post

>>you just alternate the weights in the slots so the same weights are opposite each other.<<

you alternate the weights, and the same weights form a tri-star, like the points on a mercedes emblem, not really 'opposite' each other.

marc


 
thom
unregistered user
Nov-09-04, 03:37 PM (EDT)
 
7. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #5
 
   "you alternate the weights, and the same weights form a tri-star, like the points on a mercedes emblem, not really 'opposite' each other."

Thanks for the update & clarification!
thom


 
Brooke
Member since Jun-3-02
2807 posts
Nov-09-04, 00:57 AM (EDT)
 
6. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #3
 
   Yes, that is where the difference can come in versus another one or versus stock. The old plain jane polini variator used to come with two different ramps to suit ones needs. The face that comes in contact with the belt can also be modified but I think in most cases stays the same on aftermarket ones as it matches the angle on the outer face. I think the weight size differences are mainly for proprietary reasons of selling more weights but I think the weight distribution comes into effect over a broader range of power outputs.


 
J
unregistered user
Nov-10-04, 00:05 AM (EDT)
 
8. "RE: Variator Roller Weights - Guide lines for tuning yo"
In response to message #6
 
   The biggets roll that the weight play is mainly in the 25-35mph range. that is the point at which the the weigh ttranfers from inner to outer. The movment of the weights is not taking effect throught out the powerband. If you have bog between 25-35 vmph you have too heavy of wieghts. Conversly if you wind out all of your power on low rpms and go no where you have too light of wieghts. Mostly all other functions of the power abnd comes from the tourque converter and torque spings. Not to mention clutch springs which controles you take off rpms and the angles of the vario and torque band faces themselves along with the channel angles in the torque driver, which dictated you "gearing ratio" for lack of a better term. Weights wont nessicarily give you more top end unless you want to run like crap getting up there. Joe


 

 

 


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